Vital Steps for Hurricane Preparedness

Hurricanes are one of the few disasters for which you can anticipate some warning. Thanks to today’s advanced satellite tracking, we often get at least three days notice when a hurricane is heading towards land fall, and often four or five. A prudent survivalist will make the most of this time.  Compared to the three minute warning you may receive in a tornado, three days is a huge amount of time to prepare and even someone who has done no previous planning can get into pretty decent shape in 72 hours.


If your home is near the shore and the rising surf is threatening, or you appear to be in the direct course of the hurricane, you may be better off evacuating to higher ground. Keep in mind that the storm surge and wind damage may be limited to areas near the shore, but heavy rain and subsequent flooding can result in an emergency situation sometimes hundreds of mile inland.  Few areas are capable of handling 12 or 15 inches of rain in a four to six-hour period.  Heavy rain from hurricanes and tropical storms has caused mudslides, washed out roads, flooded creeks, streams and rivers, generated damaging lighting strikes and even spawned tornadoes hundreds of miles inland.

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Dave’s Tips: Test Your Survival Stuff and Yourself

Did you hear about the fellow who unpacked and set up his new kerosene heater after the ice storm knocked out the power, only to find its igniter needed 2 D-cell batteries? It wasn’t a laughing matter.


Or the family who could not use all the power from their generator because they didn’t have an extension cord with the correct NEMA 14L-30P twist lock? They spent a few days in the dark.
Dave's Tips: Test Your Survival Stuff and Yourself


You can prevent this kind of a situation by testing and practicing with your preps before you need them. Get familiar with your tools, unpack and assemble your equipment, and test and optimize things before you need to rely on them in an emergency. Not only can you rest assured that you really are prepped, but you will have the knowledge and confidence to use your gear in an emergency.


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Dave’s Tips: Don’t Plan to Hunt When the SHTF

Planning to Hunt for Food in a Post-apocalyptic Scenario? Think Twice.

We often hear of people who plan to hunt as a way to feed their family in a TEOTWAWKI situation. Dave’s advice is to think twice. There are several downsides to hunting in a post-apocalypse scenario.


First, everyone else will probably have the same idea, quickly leading to a scarcity of game. Unregulated hunting in populated areas will decimate populations of white tail deer and other game animals, making it a short-term solution at best. Even if you have planned ahead and live in a sparsely populated area with plenty of wild animals, you will have to manage the game population by using good practices such as only taking male deer or dry mothers who do not have young ones that still depend on them.


Second, keep in mind that gunshots will draw attention to you. You and a dozen other guys are in a state park hunting deer to feed your starving families. You get lucky and kill one. How soon will it be before some other hungry fellow comes to take your kill, possibly leaving your family not only hungry, but down a member?


Third, conditions may be such that hunting is impractical or impossible. Maybe whatever caused the TEOTWAKI also killed off the deer. Maybe the (pick one) radiation, comet strike, dust from the volcano, or the virus make it impossible to go out hunting.

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Dave’s Tips: Use Ammo Cans to Keep Gear Dry and Safe

It probably comes as no surprise that .50 caliber ammo cans are just great for storing ammo, but they can be used to protect and store things like radios, first aid supplies, spare parts, and rechargeable batteries.


Familiar to generations of soldiers, army navy store aficionados, and most preppers, the big green .50 caliber ammo can is a sturdy metal box with a tight, waterproof seal. Available new or surplus, ammo cans come with hinged top that can be removed, a convenient carry handle, and a solid latch that clamps down tight. The bottoms have a divot to accommodate the folded handle of another can, so they can stack on top of each other for convenient storage.

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Fresh Perpetual Stew: Quick, Cheap, & Easy DIY Pots

Fresh Perpetual Stew -- Captain Dave's NewsI overlooked one minor detail when planning my garden—I didn’t think about the cost of dirt and pots. Of course, I knew I would need them, but for whatever reason I was kind of shocked when I got to the store to buy them.


Before I get too far, let’s talk pots. There are pots designed for any needs you may have for your plants. If you want something sturdy you can buy clay pots. If you’re going to frequently move your pots around a space (like I am) then you can buy plastic pots. There are fancy-pantsy painted pots for indoor plants and huge, 50 gallon, decorative rain barrel planter-urns. You can even buy self-watering planters.


One thing you always need to remember when buying pots is that no matter how long the plant lives, the pot will stay with you for a few years provided you don’t break it.


Personally, I feel this is where large home repair stores and nurseries end up cheating gardners. Many times people will justify spending a little bit more money on a decorative pot or a pot that claims to be sturdier than the average container because they know that a pot is an investment. Also, let’s face it, there are a lot of people out there who want to be really decorative and cute with their plants. Since I’m more concerned about the health of the plants rather than the pin-ability of it’s container, I just went looking for plain plastic pots.

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Dave’s Tips: Make the Most Out of Your Paracord


Dave's Tip - Brightly Colored ParacordRight now, there’s 100 feet of paracord in my bug out bag. There’s 100 feet in my car, and there’s a big spool of it in my basement. And I’m not the only prepper who finds Paracord useful. So why is paracord so popular with preppers?


First, when you are trying to improvise a shelter or make repairs, a bit of rope or cord can help. String some paracord between two trees and you have a roof line over which to throw a tarp or even a military style poncho, and your shelter is quickly taking shape. Break a shoe lace or blow out a zipper on your pack? Paracord can help you get up and running again. Need to hang something up, tie something down, or tie a rope a bunch of stuff together? This tough cord can do it.


is so versatile because of its strength and make up. It’s also popular because its affordable. A nylon sheath surrounding 7 thin strands, it has a test weight of 550 pounds, which is why it is often called 550 cord. If necessary, you can pull the thinner white strings out of the paracord sheath and you have a line for fishing, for making a snare, a tripwire, or for sewing up a piece of torn clothing or gear.

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Fresh Perpetual Stew: Rules for the Farmer’s Market


In my mind, any urban area that has nice sidewalks and streetlamps counts as “the city.” And don’t get me wrong, I am blessed with a quaint apartment in town. I love having the option to walk to the office, the coffee shop, or the grocery store around the corner, but I always find myself missing the country. I miss seeing the trees growing over dusty gravel roads and passing more tractors than traffic signs. I think about the quiet nights and friendly neighbors and the way you can actually smell the freshness of sunshine.

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Dave’s Tips: Some Survival Jobs Call for a Hatchet

There a great deal of emphasis put on survival knives these days, and they are featured prominently on survival-related TV shows, often as the primary tool given to a survivalist abandoned somewhere off the beaten track.


We like a good survival knife, and we sell plenty of blades that fit into that category. But we also like the simple hatchet, which has many outdoor and survival uses and is often a better choice than a knife. For example, you may be able to chop down a small tree to make a ridge pole using your knife, but the job will go faster with a hatchet. You may be able to use the butt of your knife as a hammer, but that’s another job for which your hatchet is better suited.

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Fresh Perpetual Stew: An Introduction to Your First Survival Garden

Captain Dave is pleased to welcome columnist NCPrepper.  She plans to report in regularly on her first urban survival garden and share other cooking and food prep tips for preppers in the column Fresh Perpetual Stew. To learn more about perpetual stew and other prepping tips, check out our Captain Dave’s Survival Guide

Growing up in rural Louisiana, I was always helping my mom with her garden. In the spring we’d sit on the couch at night and map out plans on a bright yellow notepad. Basil and rosemary in the front beds, tomatoes and cucumbers in the side yard, and of course new flowers along all four sides of the house. By the time summer rolled around there would be cosmos and zinnias popping up along the raised beds and our kitchen counter would be covered in more ripe, juicy cherry tomatoes and meaty Romas than we’d know what to do with. We’d water in the morning, checking the plants and picking a few veggies, then water again at night and pick a few more. Mom would even go through and pull these large green caterpillars off our tomatoes and squish them between her bare fingers—one of the many pests that loved our tomatoes. As the summer would wind down we’d give a hefty portion of our harvest to our neighbors and friends at church, mom would make basil pesto and freeze tomatoes for sauces in the fall and winter months.

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