Dave’s Tips: Some Survival Jobs Call for a Hatchet

There a great deal of emphasis put on survival knives these days, and they are featured prominently on survival-related TV shows, often as the primary tool given to a survivalist abandoned somewhere off the beaten track.

 

We like a good survival knife, and we sell plenty of blades that fit into that category. But we also like the simple hatchet, which has many outdoor and survival uses and is often a better choice than a knife. For example, you may be able to chop down a small tree to make a ridge pole using your knife, but the job will go faster with a hatchet. You may be able to use the butt of your knife as a hammer, but that’s another job for which your hatchet is better suited.

Contine reading

How to “Un-Pop” Your Pop-Up Tent

We heard a story about a woman who went camping with a pop up tent, but did not know how to fold it back up. After trying to fold the tent for an hour, she stuffed it in the back of her car and drove off in frustration. She described driving home with an open tent filling half her car as similar to driving a car filled with thirty helium balloons. All of the fun family camping memories were crowded out because she didn’t know the trick to re-packing her tent.

 

The pop-up tent may be difficult to fold up if you have never seen it done. There is a trick to it, however, and once you learn that trick, you will find collapsing your pop-up tent to be much easier than taking down and repacking a traditional tent.

 

To keep your next camping trip from devolving into a similar Griswold-like catastrophe, we’ve provided these six easy steps to refold or take down and re-pack your pop-up tent:

Contine reading

Ten Tips for the Best Camping Trip

In honor of National Camping Month, we’re offering 10 tips to help new campers get the most out of the experience.

 

These tips are for those going to a public or private campground that offers some basic amenities, including a fire ring, a picnic table, and a flat place for your tent or trailer. We assume you have basics like a tent, sleeping bag, and food and water, and that the campground has running water available at a central location as well as communal bathrooms. In our experience, the campgrounds at national and state parks usually meet these basic requirements, but check in advance to be sure your intended destination does.

 

TentCamping

 

Contine reading