Dave’s Tips: Don’t Plan to Hunt When the SHTF

Planning to Hunt for Food in a Post-apocalyptic Scenario? Think Twice.

We often hear of people who plan to hunt as a way to feed their family in a TEOTWAWKI situation. Dave’s advice is to think twice. There are several downsides to hunting in a post-apocalypse scenario.

 

First, everyone else will probably have the same idea, quickly leading to a scarcity of game. Unregulated hunting in populated areas will decimate populations of white tail deer and other game animals, making it a short-term solution at best. Even if you have planned ahead and live in a sparsely populated area with plenty of wild animals, you will have to manage the game population by using good practices such as only taking male deer or dry mothers who do not have young ones that still depend on them.

 

Second, keep in mind that gunshots will draw attention to you. You and a dozen other guys are in a state park hunting deer to feed your starving families. You get lucky and kill one. How soon will it be before some other hungry fellow comes to take your kill, possibly leaving your family not only hungry, but down a member?

 

Third, conditions may be such that hunting is impractical or impossible. Maybe whatever caused the TEOTWAKI also killed off the deer. Maybe the (pick one) radiation, comet strike, dust from the volcano, or the virus make it impossible to go out hunting.

Contine reading

Dave’s Tips: Use Ammo Cans to Keep Gear Dry and Safe

It probably comes as no surprise that .50 caliber ammo cans are just great for storing ammo, but they can be used to protect and store things like radios, first aid supplies, spare parts, and rechargeable batteries.

1

Familiar to generations of soldiers, army navy store aficionados, and most preppers, the big green .50 caliber ammo can is a sturdy metal box with a tight, waterproof seal. Available new or surplus, ammo cans come with hinged top that can be removed, a convenient carry handle, and a solid latch that clamps down tight. The bottoms have a divot to accommodate the folded handle of another can, so they can stack on top of each other for convenient storage.

Contine reading

Fresh Perpetual Stew: Quick, Cheap, & Easy DIY Pots

Fresh Perpetual Stew -- Captain Dave's NewsI overlooked one minor detail when planning my garden—I didn’t think about the cost of dirt and pots. Of course, I knew I would need them, but for whatever reason I was kind of shocked when I got to the store to buy them.

 

Before I get too far, let’s talk pots. There are pots designed for any needs you may have for your plants. If you want something sturdy you can buy clay pots. If you’re going to frequently move your pots around a space (like I am) then you can buy plastic pots. There are fancy-pantsy painted pots for indoor plants and huge, 50 gallon, decorative rain barrel planter-urns. You can even buy self-watering planters.

 

One thing you always need to remember when buying pots is that no matter how long the plant lives, the pot will stay with you for a few years provided you don’t break it.

 

Personally, I feel this is where large home repair stores and nurseries end up cheating gardners. Many times people will justify spending a little bit more money on a decorative pot or a pot that claims to be sturdier than the average container because they know that a pot is an investment. Also, let’s face it, there are a lot of people out there who want to be really decorative and cute with their plants. Since I’m more concerned about the health of the plants rather than the pin-ability of it’s container, I just went looking for plain plastic pots.

Contine reading

Dave’s Tips: Make the Most Out of Your Paracord

 

Dave's Tip - Brightly Colored ParacordRight now, there’s 100 feet of paracord in my bug out bag. There’s 100 feet in my car, and there’s a big spool of it in my basement. And I’m not the only prepper who finds Paracord useful. So why is paracord so popular with preppers?

 

First, when you are trying to improvise a shelter or make repairs, a bit of rope or cord can help. String some paracord between two trees and you have a roof line over which to throw a tarp or even a military style poncho, and your shelter is quickly taking shape. Break a shoe lace or blow out a zipper on your pack? Paracord can help you get up and running again. Need to hang something up, tie something down, or tie a rope a bunch of stuff together? This tough cord can do it.

 


Paracord
is so versatile because of its strength and make up. It’s also popular because its affordable. A nylon sheath surrounding 7 thin strands, it has a test weight of 550 pounds, which is why it is often called 550 cord. If necessary, you can pull the thinner white strings out of the paracord sheath and you have a line for fishing, for making a snare, a tripwire, or for sewing up a piece of torn clothing or gear.

Contine reading

Dave’s Tips: Redundancy and Variety are Critical for Preppers

Redundancy and Variety are Critical for Preppers || Captain Dave's News & Views

“One is none and two is one” is an old saw for most serious preppers. It addresses the fact that if you have only one of something, you may soon have none since it is likely to break or wear out. Redundancy is important, but don’t forget to add some variety to your redundancy.

 

For example, imagine that you decided to count on a water filter to filter all your water. You go out and by a Katadyn Ceradyn filter or a Big Berkey. Knowing that “one is none and two is one” you buy the spare parts kit and some extra filters. Knowing that you can always boil water if necessary, you figure you are covered.

Contine reading